When looking at statistical outcome of Lung Cancer, I found this UK site that breaks down the information into multiple categories starting with ‘non small cell lung cancer’ and ‘small cell lung cancer’ and then four stages below that:

Outcome by stage – non small cell lung cancer

There are 4 main stages for lung cancer. In 2007 a worldwide study (the Lung Cancer Staging Project) collected data about lung cancer on more than 81,000 patients from 19 countries. The study gave the following statistics about survival for non small cell lung cancer. There is a range of statistics for each stage because for some patients the stage was based on the results of scans and tests and for other patients the stage was more accurately detected by surgery.

Stage 1

This is the earliest stage and so has the best outcome. Depending on where the cancer is, it is often possible to remove stage one lung cancer with surgery. Unfortunately, it is not very common for lung cancer to be diagnosed this early. Stage 1 non small cell lung cancer is divided into 2 stages, stage 1A and 1B.

Of all the people with stage 1A non small cell lung cancer, around 58% to 73% will live for 5 years or more.

Of all the people with stage 1B non small cell lung cancer, around 43% to 58% will live for 5 years or more.

Stage 2

Stage 2 non small cell lung cancer is also divided into stage 2A and 2B. For stage 2A lung cancer, about 36 to 46 out of every 100 people diagnosed (36 to 46%) will live for at least 5 years with treatment. For stage 2B non small cell lung cancer, about 25 to 36 out of every 100 diagnosed (25 to 36%) will live for at least 5 years.

Stage 3

As you might expect, the survival statistics fall with more advanced stages of lung cancer. Again,stage 3 is divided into stage 3A and stage 3B. For stage 3A non small cell lung cancer, about 19 to 24 out of every 100 people diagnosed will live for at least 5 years. For stage 3B, around 7 to 9 out of every 100 people diagnosed (7 to 9%) will live for at least 5 years.

Stage 4

Stage 4 is the most advanced stage, where the cancer has spread. Understandably, the survival statistics are very low for this stage. Unfortunately, lung cancer is often diagnosed late and for many people the cancer has already spread when they are diagnosed. Only about 2 to 13% out of every 100 people (2 to 13%) diagnosed with stage 4 non small cell lung cancer will live for at least 5 years.

It can seem illogical for stage 3B cancer to have 5 year survival rates from 7 to 9% and stage 4 from 2 to 13%. The reason for this is that the staging system only looks at the extent of the cancer. It does not look at the specific types of cancer. So the stage 4 group may include more people who have slowly growing cancers or cancer that responds very well to particular treatments than the stage 3 group.

 

Outcome by stage – small cell lung cancer

Sometimes doctors divide small cell lung cancers into just 2 groups. These are limited disease (the cancer has not spread beyond the lung) and extensive disease (the cancer has spread beyond the lung).

Of all the people diagnosed with small cell lung cancer, around 1 in 3 have limited disease at the time of diagnosis. With treatment about 25 out of every 100 people (25%) will live for at least 2 years.

2 out of 3 people with small cell lung cancer already have extensive disease at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately the survival rate is very low. With treatment, fewer than 5 out of every 100 people will live for at least 5 years.

The Lung Cancer Staging Project used the TNM staging system to give the following statistics about survival based on the stage found by scans and tests. The project included more than 8,000 patients with small cell lung cancer.

Stage 1

Stage 1 small cell lung cancer is divided into 2 stages, stage 1A and 1B.

Of all the people with stage 1A small cell lung cancer, around 38% will live for 5 years or more.

Of all the people with stage 1B small cell lung cancer, around 21% will live for 5 years or more.

Stage 2

Stage 2 small cell lung cancer is also divided into stage 2a and 2B. For stage 2A lung cancer, about 38 out of every 100 people diagnosed (38%) will live for at least 5 years with treatment. For stage 2B small cell lung cancer, about 18 out of every 100 people diagnosed (18%) will live for at least 5 years.

The survival rates for stage 2A seemed to be higher than for stage 1B and researchers think this is because the study had very few patients in the stage 2A group so those statistics may not be so reliable as the others.

Stage 3

As you might expect, the survival statistics fall with more advanced stages of lung cancer. Again,stage 3 is divided into stage 3A and stage 3B. For stage 3A small cell lung cancer, about 13 out of every 100 people diagnosed (13%) will live for at least 5 years. For stage 3B, around 9 out of every 100 people diagnosed (9%) will live for at least 5 years.

Stage 4

Stage 4 is the most advanced stage, where the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Understandably, the survival statistics are lowest for this stage. Unfortunately, lung cancer is often diagnosed late and for many people the cancer has already spread when they are diagnosed. Only about 1 out of every 100 people (1%) diagnosed with stage 4 small cell lung cancer will live for at least 5 years.

See Additional Information: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/type/lung-cancer/treatment/statistics-and-outlook-for-lung-cancer

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This is 77chev (Pirate4x4) Range Rover.  “For my grandpa who died from lung cancer 11/06/96  ”

77chev snow lung cancer